What happens after a nuclear power plant accident?

This animation explains what happens after a nuclear power plant accident. That might be an industrial accident or a nuclear accident. If a nuclear accident occurs, every effort is made to deal with it. Incidentally, the risk of a nuclear accident is very small.

What happens after a nuclear power plant accident?

(On-screen title: What happens after a nuclear power plant accident? An animation.)

VOICE-OVER: What happens after a nuclear power plant accident?

(Two figures with a dog look at a nuclear power plant.)

Something is going on. You hear sirens and see vehicles driving to the site.

(First responders arrive at the nuclear power plant.)

There are many buildings on the site. There could be a fire
or perhaps someone has broken their leg.
Nuclear accidents in the nuclear area produce few outward signs.
At most, the plant releases some steam, but that's nothing unusual.
Inside, skilled staff work hard to bring the nuclear power plant to a safe condition
and to prevent the release of radioactivity.
But if a release of radioactivity seems likely,
special teams assess the potential impact
and the government prepares to take measures.
Every effort is made to deal with the accident quickly,
but the situation may deteriorate.
A radioactive cloud could reach residential areas.

(A radioactive cloud drifts toward a village with, among other things, a school and a church. The hands of a clock turn quickly.)

TRANQUIL MUSIC

The government and the residents then have a few hours or so in which to take steps.

(Two figures stand in a control room.)

Various security systems keep the risk of a nuclear accident as low as possible.
However, should something happen,
everything will be done to limit the release of radioactive substances.

(The Dutch coat of arms, next to: Authority for Nuclear Safety and Radiation Protection. The screen turns dark green and white. On-screen text: For more information, visit: www.anvs.nl.)

More information: www.anvs.nl.